Blog

Codifying equitable TOD for Sound Transit’s surplus land

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Seattle is taking steps to make sure that its new light rail stations will serve people with low- and moderate-incomes—those who stand to benefit most from the new transit access—by combining traditional TOD with a focus on equity (also known as equitable TOD or eTOD).

KC Streetcar: A demonstration of the possible

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This month on Building Better Communities with Transit we’re joined by the Executive Director of the KC Streetcar Authority, Tom Gerend. In 2016, Kansas City, MO opened the first streetcar the city has seen in almost 60 years and transformed the city’s downtown. Former skeptics of the line are now some of the KC Streetcar’s biggest proponents as businesses have boomed and more people are moving to—and spending money in—the center city. The 2.2 mile KC Streetcar, akin to a downtown circulator, is “a demonstration of the possible.”

“The role of a transit agency isn’t just moving people, it’s economic development”

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Value capture, gentrification, and building affordable housing around transit were among the many topics on the agenda at the 2018 LOCUS Leadership Summit: Rebuild America’s Neighborhoods. With value capture in particular, having developers and consultants with relevant experience in the room provided some important insights into how to successfully execute such projects.

Reconnecting Somerville with Transit

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This month, we’re joined by Somerville Mayor Joseph Curtatone on Building Better Communities with Transit to learn about how the Green Line Extension is transforming the city by reconnecting it with high-capacity rail transit.

The impact of station location on TOD

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Parks and open space highlighted in the Sun Valley Neighborhood Plan. Mile High Stadium can be seen at the top and Decatur-Federal Station along Rude Park (Photo: City and County of Denver)
Planning for TOD is often dependent on the specific location of stations along a transit corridor. This week a few different discussions arose around early planning for rail lines in Seattle while in Denver, development possibilities increased next to an existing station.

When a transit-oriented development misses the point

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A new residential development on one of the most transit-oriented, walkable corners of Southern California will have more parking than housing. Getting parking right is critical if transit-oriented developments are going to make the most of transit, reduce dependence on cars, and provide more attainable housing without having to bake the high cost of structured parking into every unit for sale or rent.