Blog

Major bus corridors chosen for expanded TOD policy

/

In Chicago, the groundwork is being laid to expand the city’s TOD policy regulations from the initial two heavy ridership corridors to eight that encompass 20 different bus routes. The policy will allow denser developments with less parking in proximity to select stations.

‘Crossroads of America’ gets a bus lane

/


This month on Building Better Communities with Transit we are joined by Sean Northup, Deputy Director of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization. Sean chats about the Indianapolis Red Line, the first of three BRT routes that will crisscross the region. Those lines and other transit improvements are being funded in part by local, dedicated funding which was won after a long and arduous process, as Sean explains.

Statewide TOD legislation, take two

/


In an attempt to address the extreme housing shortage in California, State Senator Scott Wiener has introduced a bill that would rezoning much of the state, allowing construction of new homes in job- and transit-rich neighborhoods. The new bill builds on one that failed to gain traction in last year’s legislature.

Durham-Orange TOD could yield almost $2 billion in tax revenue

/


Initial findings from a recently released TOD Guidebook by GoTriangle suggests property values near the Durham to Chapel Hill, NC light rail line could result in $3.3 to $4.5 billion in increased property values and $1.4 to $1.9 billion in increased tax revenue over the next 40 years.

Housing for buses and people

/


But innovative thinking and new technologies are changing the discussion around potential uses for bus depots, as in San Francisco where the SFMTA has opened up the possibility of building new housing to help pay for the renovation of a 103-year-old maintenance facility.

America’s most successful BRT?

/


A month ago, Cleveland’s HealthLine celebrated its 10th anniversary, and there is certainly plenty to celebrate. As one of the nation’s first examples of bus rapid transit (BRT), the HealthLine has spurred about $9.5 billion in investment over the last decade up and down the corridor where it runs.

Chicago explores community led solutions for equitable TOD

/


In Chicago, TOD is seen as a positive influence with environmental, fiscal, and health benefits for everyone. Yet new development near transit doesn’t seem to be happening everywhere in Chicago, especially in neighborhoods with high poverty rates and a history of redlining and segregation on the South and West sides. Now, more advocates and organizations are starting to bring investment to these communities.

The Garden State’s new Office of TOD

/

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy recently signed a law establishing an Office of Real Estate Economic Development and Transit-Oriented Development at New Jersey Transit. The bill requires that the new office submit a report annually directly to the governor’s office with an inventory of each parcel owned by NJ Transit including the appraised value, revenues generated, and current use.

Capturing the value of location

/


This month, Building Better Communities with Transit is all about value capture. We chat with Professor Deborah Salon of Arizona State University her research on the topic and how institutional structure, entrepreneurship, and creativity play into successfully using value capture.

TOD for buses? Chicago says “yes!”

/


Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s plan to expand the city’s TOD 2013 ordinance to apply to the city’s “high ridership, high frequency” bus routes could encourage even more bus ridership by increasing the supply of housing along major bus corridors.